Tag Archives: PSU Cover

LED Bridge Lamp Power Supply

Next up in my series on building my own interpretation of Janis’ LED Bridge Lamp I wanted to share out my re-mix of his power supply cover/case.

3/4 view of completed power supply and case
3/4 view of completed power supply and case

In the original case, from the photos and models on Thingiverse it looked like Janis cut off the front of the case to attach the various plugs and switches. I also couldn’t find the exact same switch and plug so I decided to re-mix my over version.

Test print this sample to make sure it properly fits around your power supply. If it doesn't fit you can scale and re-print until you get it right.
Test print this sample to make sure it properly fits around your power supply. If it doesn’t fit you can scale and re-print until you get it right.

I started off with Janis’ solid bottom of the PSU cover. I bought the same 5V/20A power supply from AliExpress and printed the bottom. It fit great. I then imported his model into SketchUp and copied the outline/profile of his case. I extruded it 2mm and printed it as a test sample. This is useful for folks trying to scale the case up or down to get that tight friction fit — change your settings then print that test piece until you get the size you want — then use the same settings for the actual parts.

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Printed parts ready to go.

I extruded that test print model to be 80mm tall — this forms the majority of the cover. I also added a depth stop at 40mm and a carefully laid out two holes to receive the screws that secure the custom faceplate. This long extruded part with a stop gives me a positive depth stop and a reasonable amount of space in the enclosure to house all the wires, connections and backs of the connectors.

I also designed a separate faceplate with nice form fitting cutouts for the plugs, power inlet and switch. Print the cover face down as shown below:

Underside of Faceplate
Underside of Faceplate

The face of the above cover also has a nice recessed ‘5V’ to let potential users know what voltage we are outputting with this unit. The 110V/220V power inlet is secured with two M3 x 10mm screws and 2 nuts on each screw. The power button snaps into place with tabs. The metal barrel jacks are secured via a lock washer and nut that threads onto the barrel/body of the outlet. Make sure the PSU unit’s slide switch is set to the 110V or 220V input voltage you plan to provide.

All wires soldered in place and covered with heat shrink tubing
All wires soldered in place and covered with heat shrink tubing

All of the output port wires were 6″ long 22 gauge wire. The power inlet hot and neutral are routed through the power switch and the ground goes from the inlet to the ground on the PSU unit. I also used heat shrink tubing on each connection to protect the connections.

Attaching all the wires to the appropriate terminals
Attaching all the wires to the appropriate terminals

Route the wires through the extruded cover and attach them to the proper terminals, then slide the cover down until you hit the depth stop.

Testing the power supply. Notice plug inserted into a jack being tested with my multi-meter
Testing the power supply. Notice plug inserted into a jack being tested with my multi-meter

Now test your PSU using a multi-meter. I inserted an appropriately sized barrel top plug without its protective jacket to make it easier to attach the multi-meter probes. The output was exactly what I expected — a tiny bit above 5V. If you are under 5V you can adjust the output using a trim potentiometer on the PSU board to the right of the screw terminals. With the testing complete it was time to gently bend the wires and secure the faceplate with two M3 x 6mm machine screws.

Completed power supply with power on
Completed power supply with power on

With the PSU assembled and powered on it’s time to get back to working on the bridge lamp itself.

Side view of completed power supply case in black PLA
Side view of completed power supply case in black PLA

The Gray printed PSU cover from earlier in this post will live in my cubicle at work and power the main LED Bridge lamp I am making, but the secondary (smaller) LED bridge lamp I am making for home would look better in black PLA — as I think that will blend better with my black metal MakerBench.

Completed power supply in black PLA
Completed power supply in black PLA

If you’d like to make one of these PSU covers based on my remix you can find the models on Thingiverse here.

The inlets, outlets and supplies I used can be found here:

5V / 20A power supply

Copper DC Socket Jack

Panel Mounted Inlet Socket

Red Rocker Button Switch

DC Power Barrel Tip Plugs

Metric Machine Screws

If you build your own version of this project, please leave a comment or send me a note.

Take care,
-Bill
@TheRainford
@TinWhiskerzBlog

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