Category Archives: My Designs

LED Bridge Lamp Power Supply

Next up in my series on building my own interpretation of Janis’ LED Bridge Lamp I wanted to share out my re-mix of his power supply cover/case.

3/4 view of completed power supply and case
3/4 view of completed power supply and case

In the original case, from the photos and models on Thingiverse it looked like Janis cut off the front of the case to attach the various plugs and switches. I also couldn’t find the exact same switch and plug so I decided to re-mix my over version.

Test print this sample to make sure it properly fits around your power supply. If it doesn't fit you can scale and re-print until you get it right.
Test print this sample to make sure it properly fits around your power supply. If it doesn’t fit you can scale and re-print until you get it right.

I started off with Janis’ solid bottom of the PSU cover. I bought the same 5V/20A power supply from AliExpress and printed the bottom. It fit great. I then imported his model into SketchUp and copied the outline/profile of his case. I extruded it 2mm and printed it as a test sample. This is useful for folks trying to scale the case up or down to get that tight friction fit — change your settings then print that test piece until you get the size you want — then use the same settings for the actual parts.

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Printed parts ready to go. 

I extruded that test print model to be 80mm tall — this forms the majority of the cover. I also added a depth stop at 40mm and a carefully laid out two holes to receive the screws that secure the custom faceplate. This long extruded part with a stop gives me a positive depth stop and a reasonable amount of space in the enclosure to house all the wires, connections and backs of the connectors.

I also designed a separate faceplate with nice form fitting cutouts for the plugs, power inlet and switch. Print the cover face down as shown below:

Underside of Faceplate
Underside of Faceplate

The face of the above cover also has a nice recessed ‘5V’ to let potential users know what voltage we are outputting with this unit. The 110V/220V power inlet is secured with two M3 x 10mm screws and 2 nuts on each screw. The power button snaps into place with tabs. The metal barrel jacks are secured via a lock washer and nut that threads onto the barrel/body of the outlet. Make sure the PSU unit’s slide switch is set to the 110V or 220V input voltage you plan to provide.

All wires soldered in place and covered with heat shrink tubing
All wires soldered in place and covered with heat shrink tubing

All of the output port wires were 6″ long 22 gauge wire. The power inlet hot and neutral are routed through the power switch and the ground goes from the inlet to the ground on the PSU unit. I also used heat shrink tubing on each connection to protect the connections.

Attaching all the wires to the appropriate terminals
Attaching all the wires to the appropriate terminals

Route the wires through the extruded cover and attach them to the proper terminals, then slide the cover down until you hit the depth stop.

Testing the power supply. Notice plug inserted into a jack being tested with my multi-meter
Testing the power supply. Notice plug inserted into a jack being tested with my multi-meter

Now test your PSU using a multi-meter. I inserted an appropriately sized barrel top plug without its protective jacket to make it easier to attach the multi-meter probes. The output was exactly what I expected — a tiny bit above 5V. If you are under 5V you can adjust the output using a trim potentiometer on the PSU board to the right of the screw terminals. With the testing complete it was time to gently bend the wires and secure the faceplate with two M3 x 6mm machine screws.

Completed power supply with power on
Completed power supply with power on

With the PSU assembled and powered on it’s time to get back to working on the bridge lamp itself.

Side view of completed power supply case in black PLA
Side view of completed power supply case in black PLA

The Gray printed PSU cover from earlier in this post will live in my cubicle at work and power the main LED Bridge lamp I am making, but the secondary (smaller) LED bridge lamp I am making for home would look better in black PLA — as I think that will blend better with my black metal MakerBench.

Completed power supply in black PLA
Completed power supply in black PLA

If you’d like to make one of these PSU covers based on my remix you can find the models on Thingiverse here.

The inlets, outlets and supplies I used can be found here:

5V / 20A power supply

Copper DC Socket Jack

Panel Mounted Inlet Socket

Red Rocker Button Switch

DC Power Barrel Tip Plugs

Metric Machine Screws

If you build your own version of this project, please leave a comment or send me a note.

Take care,
-Bill
@TheRainford
@TinWhiskerzBlog

Trinket Powered LED RedHat Sign

My day job is working as a software developer for Redhat which is the world’s largest Open-Source software company. It’s a fun place to work with a vibrant culture — kinda like a geek summer camp at times — as many of us like to decorate our cubes with various nerdy projects, toys, artwork etc. I love to design and build things — check out my long running woodworking blog here for some of my designs and work with wood. As an engineer I also love to tinker with tech.

Early in 2016 I bought a Lulzbot TAZ6 for home and have been having fun getting involved in the Open-Source 3D printing, electronics and maker world. I also setup and run a 3D printing lab at work in the office.

A few months ago I designed and 3D printed a small Redhat logo which you can find on Thingiverse here.

Since then I have embarked on a more audacious building campaign to build my own interpretation of Janis’ LED Bridge Lamp. I want my bridge lamp to span from one wall of my cube to my bookcase  and incorporate some fun additions that I will reveal in upcoming posts.

On the road to this large design/print/build project I wanted to make neat mini billboard with the Redhat Shadowman logo that lights up and had some simple animations. The result of that work can be seen here:

Redhat Logo Sign Animated Rainbow Color
Redhat Logo Sign Animated Rainbow Color

I tripled the size of my original Redhat Shadowman logo in the x and y dimensions and printed the background in clear Colorfabb nGen filament. The letters, fedora and case are in black and red nGen filament. Every 2.01mm of z-axis height I would pause the print, swap, purge and resume the print which resulted in a nice 3 color print for the logo.

Remove supports so you can add the trinket
Remove supports so you can add the trinket

I designed the case so that it can be printed without any supports. Use a pair of nippers to remove the small bit of supports I added to the model (see photo above) which will allow you to easily access the USB port on the Adafruit Trinket which controls the LED strip.

The 3 color sign has 4 holes that snap nicely onto posts located on the inside of the bezel of the case. I don’t know why so many designers make the holes and posts the exact same size — it makes for unnecessary fussing with the print. I made my posts a few tenths of a millimeter narrower so I could snap on the logo without any fussing.

Back of case with negative image of Redhat logo
Back of case with negative image of Redhat logo

The back of the case also has a nice negative image of the Redhat Shadowman logo. The back also snaps nicely into the front section for clean lines and no need for additional hardware. nGen has enough flex in it that you can bend the case if you need to open it again in the future.

The circuit design is quite simple/straightforward:

Redhat Logo Sign -- Circuit Diagram -- Adafruit Trinket 5V + NeoPixels
Redhat Logo Sign — Circuit Diagram — Adafruit Trinket 5V + NeoPixels

Basically you are driving 10 NeoPixel RGB leds via an Adafruit Trinket 5V tiny arduino. I included the JST connection below in case I ever want to re-purpose bits from this project and because these LEDs were from the start of a new roll, so I figured I might as well use the cabling it came with in this case.

Completed circuit
Completed circuit

I used some 3M double sided tape to keep the wires secured and some M3 x 6mm screws to keep the Trinket mounted to the back of the case. The LED strip comes with some adhesive tape on the back to keep the strip in place. I find that tape on the strip to be a little fussy so make sure you clean/alcohol the inside of the case and firmly press/rub the strip to make sure it is well adhered.

Redhat Logo Sign in white
Redhat Logo Sign in white

The animations for this little prototype sign are pretty straight forward. The system comes up, does a wipe to make the sign glow white. After ~30 seconds it wipes to dark and then cuts over to 30 seconds of a pleasing rainbow animation. Then the loop repeats over and over again.

You can find the source code for this project on my GitHub account here. The animations could be easily augmented. You can create your own or re-use some of the animations from my earlier Adafruit Feather BLE + NeoPixel ring lamp.

Note that he regulator on a Trinket is only 500 milliamps so I make sure to limit the maximum brightness of the LED strip to make sure I don’t overload the system when the background is set to white.

If you’d like to download the STL models for the  Redhat Logo sign and case you can find them on Thingiverse here. If you build your own version of this project, I’d love to hear about it via a comment or contact page note.

Take care,
-Bill Rainford
@TinWhiskerzBlog
@TheRainford

Tool Rack for Pliers

The workshop is my happy place — I go there to create. One of my favorite things to do out in my woodworking shop is to build cabinets, organizers and jigs to make it easier to work or accomplish a given task. I’ve been applying that to my recent work with 3D printing and electronics hardware hacking.

By training I am a software engineer and a preservation carpenter — yep the is an unusual mix to some — but to me I use the same part of my brain to envision a large software application and break it down into manageable pieces of code and then write them that I use to envision a chair and break it down into all the steps and pieces that start at a tree and result in a chair.

After getting some more work time at the Maker Workbench that I recently completed I realized that my hand tool storage was lacking.

I was storing my pliers, strippers, nippers and similar tools in the holes on the sides of the metal racks that support my workbench.

For tools that only get used infrequently the holes on the support posts of my maker workbench do a good job at keeping them off the desk, but are a pain to get in and out of for frequently used tools.
For tools that only get used infrequently the holes on the support posts of my maker workbench do a good job at keeping them off the desk, but are a pain to get in and out of for frequently used tools.

It seemed like a great idea — I can see the tools, they are off the workbench and reasonably accessible, but for common operations I felt I was wasting too much time and energy getting them in and out of those holes — as sometimes they would catch a bit on the way out.

After thinking about some of the optimizations I made out in my woodworking shop and watching videos like some of Adam Savage’s shop tours, behind the scenes and shop projects builds from tested.com and this video in particular which made the case for not using drawers I wanted to come up with something efficient to organize the tools I used most often on the bench.

The idea bounced around in my subconscious for a few weeks until I finally came up with the following tool rack for my pliers and similar tools:

Angle view of completed tool rack
Angle view of completed tool rack

How I built the tool rack:

The rack is about 6″ tall, the base is about 6″ wide and the rods are about 12″ long. I bought a 36″ long piece of O1 Tool Steel Round Rod, Polished Finish, Precision Ground, Annealed, Metric 10mm from Amazon here. I cut the rod on my abrasive cutoff saw and ground off any burs and chamfered the cut ends a bit so I would be sure they’d seat nicely in the 3D printed ends.

Test prints of end caps for 10mm rod.
Test prints of end caps for 10mm rod. (Left is Dark blue nGen filament, right is clear blue PLA)

I then made what I felt was a reasonable sized 10mm end cap in SketchUp and printed it out. It was a tiny bit tight so I measured the rod and the print and adjusted things a bit and tried printing at 102, 105 and 108%. 105% was the sweet spot and gave me a nice tight fit. I also made a variant of the end cap to include a #4-40 machine screw to see if that would keep the cap on there even tighter but felt it was negligibly better in this case and recommend you print 1 or more of these caps to dial in your printer an get a real nice fit. If you still find the cap is loose you can epoxy it into place.

Printing each side of the tool rack. Printed with a brim to try and minimize any warping.
Printing each side of the tool rack. Printed with a brim to try and minimize any warping.

With the printer dialed in and the cap in hand it was time to print the sides. Rather than waste material and to increase the aesthetics of the rack I added a series of holes to the model to give it a more pleasing and modern look.

(Left) Side with brim still attached. (Right) Cleaned up piece ready to go.
(Left) Side with brim still attached. (Right) Cleaned up piece ready to go.

I printed the sides one at a time with a brim to try and minimize any warping.

View from the side of the completed rack.
View from the side of the completed rack.

The cleanup was easy with an X-acto knife and the assembly was simply inserting the rods into the printed end pieces and start using the rack.

3/4 view of completed rack loaded up with pliers and nippers
3/4 view of completed rack loaded up with pliers and nippers

The above described rod is a bit on the expensive side, costing about $15 but the ground and polished look is what I wanted and it adds a pretty good amount of weight to the tool rack and I’ve found it stays right where I leave it on the bench. It works well with all the small and medium size pliers shown below and can also accommodate some of my larger and specialty channel-locks and similar hand tools. If you are on a budget, simple mild steel rod from a hardware store or even a wooden dowel can be used.

Top bar is about 6" above the bench top and can accommodate most sizes of plier and similar tool you are likely to encounter on a maker workbench
Top bar is about 6″ above the bench top and can accommodate most sizes of plier and similar tool you are likely to encounter on a maker workbench

I’ve shared out the plans and SketchUp files for the end caps and rack sides (both solid sides and the sides with the circular holes) up on Thingiverse.com here.

If you make or remix this project, please share some pics or notes in the comments below.

Take care,
-Bill Rainford
@TinWhiskerzBlog
@TheRainford

 

Reverse Engineer

After creating my own model and printing it the next challenge I wanted to try out was printing in to colors of filament. I don’t have a flexy dual extruder yet (though I do want one) I wanted to take a shot at designing something that would work well being printed with two colors at different layers, meaning I could pause the print, swap filaments, purge and then resume the print.

Reverse Engineer 3D Printed Sign
Reverse Engineer 3D Printed Sign

I was inspired by some of the stickers and images I’ve seen online for Reverse Engineers and decided to make a fun little sign for my maker bench.

Reverse Engineer Sign (Up Close)
Reverse Engineer Sign (Up Close)

Model Details:
I designed this model in SketchUp and exported it as an *.stl file. It can easily scaled to a larger size. I wanted to minimize the amount of warping and among of filament used. If you want a thicker base just scale up in the Z axis.

Print Details: 
Printed on LulzBot Taz 6
Dark Gray and Orange nGen Filament
20% infill, Standard Resolution and Speed
Printed scaled 2.0 in X and Y axes, and at 3.0 in the Z axis.  This gives me something a little bigger than a business card.

The trick was sitting there watching the print and pausing at just the right time to swap the filament. This meant finding the first layer wherein the background is complete and we are about to start printing the text which is proud of that surface. I looked at the layer view in Cura and could figure out when I wanted to do that filament swap. Worked great on the first print.  At some point I want to look at hacking the GCode or similar means to automate the pause, but I wanted to do it as fast as possible so the print didn’t cool down too much as I didn’t want any unnecessary adhesion issues.

I’m very happy with how this print came out and look forward to trying this technique with other models.

This model is a great addition to any maker workbench. You can download the model from Thingiverse here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1693100

If you make one, please leave a comment or link to your make photo.

Take care,
-Bill
@TinWhiskerz

Retro Rainford Sign

Back in May I ordered a Lulzbot Taz6 about a week or so after it came out — I had been waiting and saving for one for quite a while. I got to try one at the Red Hat Tower, the corporate HQ down in Raleigh NC and was quickly hooked. (I work for Red Hat, but at their engineering HQ which is is Westford MA.) Like many makers with a new 3D printer I spent a LOT of time printing random fun things from Thingiverse and similar sites.

After getting a bunch of prints under my belt the next part of my 3D printing journey was to start designing some of my own stuff to print. My first custom design was this retro looking sign of my last name — Rainford.

Original sign with separate floating dot over the 'i'
Original sign with separate floating dot over the ‘i’

I designed the model using SketchUp and extruded my name in the ‘Lobster 2’ font. I then added a base to tie all the letters together into a one piece print. I also extruded ever other letter a bit more than its neighbor so that I could preserve the serifs in 3D and create additional shadow lines.

Used SketchUp to make the model, exported to STL and sliced in Cura (Lulzbot Edition)
Used SketchUp to make the model, exported to STL and sliced in Cura (Lulzbot Edition)

After creating the model I used a SketchUp plugin to export the model into a *.stl file. I then loaded up Cura: Lulzbot edition to slice and print the sign.

Printer and Settings:
Lulzbot Taz 6
Dark Blue nGen Filament
Standard Resolution
No supports or brim
20% infill
Z-hop set to 0.75 instead of the default profile of 0.1 (I wanted the flat spaces to be smooth — worked out this value as I’d tweak it more each time I printed one. I would up printing 4 of these, one for home, one for the workshop, one for the maker bench and one for my office at work. Apparently I can’t get enough of my name or want to get my money’s worth out of the design time it took to create this model. 😉

Later prints I tweaked the model and attached the dot over the 'i'
Later prints I tweaked the model and attached the dot over the ‘i’

The lesson I learned from this was in creating some material to connect the dot over the ‘i’ to the rest of the word. The model looked great in SketchUp but that bridge didn’t show up in the print — didn’t like how some of that solid resolved internal faces I could not see in the solid view I was looking at. I eventually learned about the Cleanup^3 and Solid Inspector^2 plugins for SketchUp that helped fix that issue and I’d also inspect via View->X-Ray. So the second print had a properly connected dot. I also now look at the layers view in Cura to make sure the paths, and the brim and supports when needed show up the way I would expect.

You can find this model on the TinWhiskerz Thingiverse.com page here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1693112

Take care,
Bill
@TinWhiskerzBlog